Iphone robot ringtone what does it say

What would you name a family with 10 children with NICKNAMES? + 3 Bonus Questions?

Lucille Mary (15, twin)

Nicole Elisa (15, twin)

Bradley Mason (14)

Daniel Carter (12)

Kendall Brigid (11)

Lucas Dylan (8)

Matthew Cameron (6)

Oliviana Brittany (3, twin)

Alexiana Courtney (3, twin)

Katalina Gabrielle (2)

How to be really famous?

Iphone robot ringtone what does it say

Best answer: Basically you're asking how to become a legend. Well in order to do that, you will need to truly be unique and crazy talented. If you are a musician, you will have to be a musical genius (something most of the people you mentioned had in common). If you wanted someone to sound like Michael Jackson, the only. show more

Best answer: Basically you're asking how to become a legend. Well in order to do that, you will need to truly be unique and crazy talented. If you are a musician, you will have to be a musical genius (something most of the people you mentioned had in common). If you wanted someone to sound like Michael Jackson, the only person you could listen to was Michael Jackson himself, because he had something to offer that no one else could. Not only was he a musician, he was also a dancer and I'm pretty sure girls liked the way he looked as well.

It also helps to have an attractive personality (i.e comedy, morals, etc.)

To sum it up

1.Lots of talent

2.Uniqueness

3.Originality <-----BIG ONE (Try to do something no one has seen before. If other people want to imitate you, consider it a success)

4. It helps to know the right people but if you can get your foot in the door on your own then you should be fine

5.Give people something to talk about (whether its your looks, something you did, whatever it is it has to be newsworthy)

6. It helps to have a nice personality so people will want to work with you

*As for Adele, she just has the perfect timing. While there are a bunch of garbage artists doing everything for money nowadays, she is one of the few artists that actually sings from the heart, and that's why a lot of people like her because people can relate to her music and feel her emotions

195 answers · Celebrities · 2 days ago

The Origins Of The iPhone's Iconic Ringtone, Explained

For many people, the "boo-dah-ling" of their iPhones has become synonymous with Apple. But the iPhone's default text message ringtone was never originally intended to be part of the phone.

In a recent blog post. audio engineer Kelly Jacklin explained how he conceived the ringtone, which would eventually be called ""Tri-tone" in iOS, back in 1999. Jacklin had a friend who was working on a music app called SoundJam MP and was seeking a noise that would play when a CD was finished burning.

The post is rife with detailed and dense technical explanations, with Jacklin saying that he ended up developing 28 potential tritones made using five different instruments. In terms of what he was looking to accomplish with the tritone sound, Jacklin explained:

I was looking for something "simple" that would grab the user's attention. I thought a simple sequence of notes, played with a clean-sounding instrument, would cut through the clutter of noise in a home or office. I was really into the sound of marimbas and kalimbas at the time, so I thought I'd try both of those. For the notes, I wanted a 3-note sequence, or perhaps 4 notes. I was going for simple, and didn't have much time to devote to being creative, so no fancy timing here, just sequenced notes. I wanted a happy feel, so notes from the major scale, focussing on I, III, IV, V, and VIII (the octave).

Iphone robot ringtone what does it say

While "Tri-Tone" has become most closely associated with the iPhone, it has seen a few prior applications. Starting as the burn-disc noise on SoundJam, Apple eventually bought the app, hired some of the SoundJam team and used the tritone for its own disc-burning completion noise. Apple also used the tritone to signal when new software was done installing on some desktop computers.

When the iPhone shipped in 2007, Jacklin was surprised as anyone when "158-marimba," as the sound was originally named, came as the default text message ringtone.

"Wow! Who'd have thought?" Jacklin wrote in his post.

Read Jacklin's post for the full story, along with a sampling of all the other ringtones that could have heralded a new text on the iPhone.

The Origins Of The iPhone's Iconic Ringtone, Explained

For many people, the "boo-dah-ling" of their iPhones has become synonymous with Apple. But the iPhone's default text message ringtone was never originally intended to be part of the phone.

In a recent blog post. audio engineer Kelly Jacklin explained how he conceived the ringtone, which would eventually be called ""Tri-tone" in iOS, back in 1999. Jacklin had a friend who was working on a music app called SoundJam MP and was seeking a noise that would play when a CD was finished burning.

The post is rife with detailed and dense technical explanations, with Jacklin saying that he ended up developing 28 potential tritones made using five different instruments. In terms of what he was looking to accomplish with the tritone sound, Jacklin explained:

I was looking for something "simple" that would grab the user's attention. I thought a simple sequence of notes, played with a clean-sounding instrument, would cut through the clutter of noise in a home or office. I was really into the sound of marimbas and kalimbas at the time, so I thought I'd try both of those. For the notes, I wanted a 3-note sequence, or perhaps 4 notes. I was going for simple, and didn't have much time to devote to being creative, so no fancy timing here, just sequenced notes. I wanted a happy feel, so notes from the major scale, focussing on I, III, IV, V, and VIII (the octave).

While "Tri-Tone" has become most closely associated with the iPhone, it has seen a few prior applications. Starting as the burn-disc noise on SoundJam, Apple eventually bought the app, hired some of the SoundJam team and used the tritone for its own disc-burning completion noise. Apple also used the tritone to signal when new software was done installing on some desktop computers.

When the iPhone shipped in 2007, Jacklin was surprised as anyone when "158-marimba," as the sound was originally named, came as the default text message ringtone.

"Wow! Who'd have thought?" Jacklin wrote in his post.

Read Jacklin's post for the full story, along with a sampling of all the other ringtones that could have heralded a new text on the iPhone.

Related posts

  • Top 5 Websites to Download Free iPhone Ringtones (Including iPhone 6S iPhone 6 Plus) If you have bought a new iPhone (iPhone 6S), you must want an unique and beautiful ringtone for your iPhone....

  • What does a soft reset do to an iPhone 4 A soft, or even a hard, reset does not reset your iPhone 3G to factory settings. That is called restoring your iPhone. A soft reset keeps all of your...

  • iPhone 5S – Camera and Picture Quality iPhone 5S – Camera and Picture Quality Once again, on paper the camera on the iPhone 5S looks similar to the one on the iPhone 5. Both have 8-megapixels,...

  • How to Reset Your iPhone or iPad to Factory Settings – Quick Tip New users of iPhone and iPad want to know how you reset your iOS device to factory settings – much like in Android. iOS does...

  • Cydia Ringtone Maker Apps for Unlimited Free iPhone Ringtone advertisements With these top 3 Cydia ringtone maker tweaks from Cydia App Store, you can now make a free iPhone ringtone from any...